Acid rain in Norilsk? Things are changing

Acid rain in Norilsk? Things are changing

Some times is a good thing to take a closer look to things and see them from a different perspective.

The Bellona Foundation, an independent non-profit organization that aims to meet and fight the climate challenges, through identifying and implementing sustainable environmental solutions, recently acknowledge the efforts to reduce the pollution in Norilsk.

According to Victor Ivanov, Norilsk Nickel’s deputy director for reconstruction and industrial ecology, closing the factory, which had operated since 1942, dropped sulfur dioxide emissions from the company by 300,000 tons a year. It eliminated a further 600 sources of atmospheric pollution, of which 458 had been churning away without any environmental abatement.
— Bellona

Of course, there is a lot of work to do as the emissions are still unaceptable, but there is a general perception that things are really changing, specially after the closing of oldest and most polluting plant in Norilsk earlier in 2016, a melter built in 1942, removing annual emissions of about 380,000 tons of suplhur dioxide from its records.

Acid rain in Norilsk? Things are changing

Acid rain in Norilsk? Things are changing

Acording to the Barents Observer information a modernization project signed in 2016 with SNC-Lavalin Inc., a Canadian company is due to be completed in 2020. By that time, emissions will be cut by as much as 75 percent.

One thing that is important to stress is that due to weather conditions, with extreme air, there is not always possible that emissions concentrate to produce acid rain in the area.

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